Cross and cruciform in the Anglo-Saxon world
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Cross and cruciform in the Anglo-Saxon world studies to honor the memory of Timothy Reuter by Timothy Reuter

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Published by West Virginia University Press in Morgantown .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Statement[edited by] Sarah Larratt Keefer, Karen Louise Jolly, Catherine E. Karkov
SeriesSancta Crux/Halig Rod series -- v. 3
Classifications
LC ClassificationsBV160 .C75 2010
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24487422M
ISBN 101933202505
ISBN 109781933202501
LC Control Number2009027723
OCLC/WorldCa426253802

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The third section of the book, "The Cross: Gesture and Structure," employs methodologies drawn from archaeology, new media, and theories of rulership to develop new insights into subjects as varied as cereal production, the little-known Nunburnholme Cross, and early medieval concepts of political and Cruciform in the Anglo-Saxon World: Studies to .   It comes out of the proceedings of the Cross and Cruciform in the Anglo-Saxon World Conference in Winchester, Hampshire, England, , which set out to analyze the motif of the cross in Anglo-Saxon literature and instances of "cross and cruciform" in Anglo-Saxon culture, particularly in Christian poetry, prayers, charms, homilies, a cruciform church, and a carved stone cross. Keefer, Sarah Larrat, Jolly, Karen Louise, and Karkov, Catherine E., eds. Cross and Cruciform in the Anglo-Saxon World: Studies to Honor the Memory of Timothy Reuter. Morgantown: West Virginia University Press, Cited by: 8.   As Volume One in the Sancta Crux/Halig Rod series, this collection of new research offers fascinating glimpses into how the way the cross, the central image of Christianity in the Anglo-Saxon period, was textualized, reified, visualized, and performed.

Container and the Cross of Christ: Revelation and Community in The Dream of the Rood’, SP (), –78, at – 14 ‘Sources or Analogues? Using Liturgical Evidence to date The Dream of the Rood’, Cross and Cruciform in the Anglo-Saxon World: Studies to honor the Memory of Timothy Reuter, ed. L. Keefer, Size: KB. Oxbow Books is the world's leading publisher, distributor and bookseller in archaeology and the ancient world. provides a series of unique insights into Anglo-Saxon life in England during the 8th to 10th centuries. £ The City by the Pool. This volume offers a new and up-to-date synthesis of Lincoln's long history as a major city and. A cruciform manuscript was a form of Anglo-Saxon / Insular manuscript written with the words in a block shaped like a cross. The earliest developed depiction of the Last Judgement in the West is also found on an Anglo-Saxon ivory, and a late Anglo-Saxon Gospel book may show the earliest example of Mary Magdalene at the foot of the cross in a Crucifixion. See also.

Cross and Cruciform in the Anglo-Saxon World: Studies to Honor the Memory of Timothy Reuter - Medieval European Studies Series (Paperback) Sarah Larratt Keefer £ Paperback. The Cruciform Brooch and Anglo-Saxon England Book Description: Cruciform brooches were large and decorative items of jewellery, frequently used to pin together women's garments in pre-Christian northwest Europe. Cross and Cruciform in the Anglo-Saxon World: Studies to Honor the Memory of Timothy Reuter is edited by Sarah Larratt Keefer, Karen Louise Jolly, and Catherine E. Karkov and is the third and final volume of an ambitious research initiative begun in concerned with the image of the cross, showing how its very material form cuts across both the culture of a society and the .   Anglo-Saxon crosses in the middle of a marketplace simply present a compelling sight. The stone crosses can be traced back to the 9th century and can be found in Sandbach, Cheshire in England, thus the name Sandbach Crosses. They are unique in size, being larger than usual for its kind. English Heritage has given it a Grade 1 listed building.